Criminalizing conduct that a defendant does not understand or cannot control

There is no purpose to be served by criminalizing conduct that a defendant does not understand or cannot control.
The attempt of criminalizing conduct that the defendant has no understanding and is unable to control does not meet the criminal justice aspect of justice, equality and fairness to the parties involved as in the cases of insanity and automatism or murder of diminished responsibility and loss of control. In this regard, the defendant is controlled by external forces that they have no control over to commit a crime; thus, it will be only fair to address the external factors instead of convicting the defendant. The field of criminal justice has experienced mixed reactions and opinions on handling defendants that have been involved in committing crimes out of their own free will in the interest of serving justice, equality and fairness to the defendant and the victims in the crimes (Ormerod, 2015). It is vital to note that circumstances and conditions experienced by the defendants incline them to engage in crime, and thus convicting them without considering their condition will not serve the aspects of justice, fairness and equality to the parties is interested in such cases. Consequently, the law needs to be sufficiently developed and equipped to ensure that it can effectively handle the cases where the defendant engages in crime due to insanity, automatisms and conditions beyond their control. In this regard, the defendant is handled most appropriately to ensure they are offered the relevant help to ensure that they do not engage in such crimes or any other crime in the future due to their nature and external forces. In such cases, persons involved in crime due to insanity or external forces should be judged or handled differently from normal people engaged in crime out of their free will. The process of criminalizing the conduct of a defendant should be based on the defendant’s condition (insanity and automatism) and circumstances (diminished responsibility and loss of control)to determine their guilt in the interest of serving justice, equality and fairness to all the parties involved.
The legal position of defendants unable to understand or control their criminal conduct
The legal position on handling insanity driven crimes have consistently changed as indicated through the defense approaches and tactics adopted and accepted in the courts of law. In this regard, the English law enables a suspect of a crime not convicted on very restricted occasions because they were insane at the time of the crime (Peay, 2012). The criminal lawyers pull an insanity defense to exonerate their clients from the criminal accusations. On the other hand, the automatism aspect is raised when the victim was in total lack of control for their action at the time of the alleged offense.
First, the law as provisions regulating the unfitness to take a plea to prevent suspects being put on trial from trial since they are thought to be incapable of participating appropriately in the legal proceedings. The criminal justice system deems it unfair to try a suspect who cannot defend themselves due to legally defend themselves (Peay, 2012). When the judge decides that the defendant is not fit to stand trial, the trial stops, and fact-finding heating occurs instead. When the hearing ends, and the judge decided that the suspect got involved in crime due to insanity, they are not convicted and thus cannot be sentenced.
The unfitness to take plea entails the mental state of the accused at the time of trial. At the same time, the defenses on the automatism and insanity concentrate on the accused’s mental state when they committed the offense. The suspect of a crime might have a mental disorder that influenced them when they were involved in crime, and the same mental disorder must be affecting when the case is taken to court (Dejchai, 2019). The aspect of unfitness and insanity overlap, but they involve various questions on the accused person’s mental capacity to handle the criminal justice process’s different stages. The insanity and automatism aspects are defined and ascertained from the field of psychology, psychiatry and medicine.
The insanity defense is provided under the “M’Naghten Rules,” as presented by the House of Lords in 1843, to establish a defense on insanity. The insanity defense goes through when it is proved that at the time of the act the accused was acting under the influence of disease of the mind, and does not know what they were doing was in contravention of set laws and rules (Dejchai, 2019). When the defendant effectively balances the probability that they lie within the insanity test, then the Crown Court will argue that they are not guilty because of insanity, also referred to as “special verdict.”
On the defense of automatism, it comes to play when the accused person lacked control of their actions and body when they were involved in committing a crime (Dejchai, 2019). The defense of automatism is available to all forms of crimes. In automatism, the accused need to present enough evidence to ensure that automatism becomes an issue of dispute between the prosecution and defense.
Deficiencies law handling defendants unable to understand or control their criminal conduct
The law has technicalities and weaknesses in addressing the defendant’s issue involved in crime as a result of automatism and insanity, thus requiring effective reform to streamline the operation of the law. In this regard, there are legal technicalities that affect the application of the unfitness to plead aspect. There is the question of whether a person is unfit to take a plea and stand trial will come when the accused is entering a plea to take charge of guilty or not, if not before (Rix, 2016). In order to be fit to take a plea and stand trial, the suspect must be capable of doing certain things such as instructing a lawyer to handle their case or follow trial proceedings. However, the challenge arises in that the legal test adopted in evaluating the accused’s fitness does not cover all the right abilities. The legal test sets the fitness threshold too high. The law does not prescribe the procedure nor the process to be adopted to evaluate and assess the accused’s fitness to stand trial. In this case, the current law’s effect is to limit the number of people found unfit to take a plea, meaning that many people are tried when their state of mind is not fit for standing trial or taking a plea. Therefore, there is a need to adopt reforms by setting parameters and processes to be adopted to test a person’s fitness to take a plea or stand trial. This approach would ensure an increase in the number of persons with grave mental disorders found not fit to stand trial and a decreasing number of people relying on reformed insanity defense for their crimes.
The law presents difficulties in defining the real meaning of “disease of the mind” regarding if it’s a disease or a disorder and that the word mind is not interpreted to mean the brain, thus confusing in determining the insanity defense. The M’Naghten test argues that the accused must be suffering from a defect of reason from the mind’s disease. The judges expound the phrase further to interpret the mind’s disease to be an impairment of mental functioning resulting from medical conditioning (Rix, 2016). In this case, the disorder is necessarily not a disease, and the word mind is not interpreted to mean the brain. The law has not limited the idea of disease of the mind to mental disorders; instead, the law has classified the lack of control caused by either the internal or external factors. The involuntary conduct caused by the internal factors is regarded as insanity and leads to a special verdict. On the other hand, involuntary conduct arising from external factors is regarded as automatism, and they amount to a simple acquittal. In this case, the law drawing a line between insanity and automatism introduces an anomaly since there is difficult to differentiate between internal (insanity) and external (automatism). There is confusion in applying the law, and thus the reform, in this case, should classify conditions that will be termed as either insanity or automatism to make it easy for judges to make decisions.
The M’Naghten law is in contradiction with the medical understanding. For instance, the terms “disease of the mind” and insanity are not legal terms but outdated legal; terms. Moreover, the term insanity is stigmatizing and inaccurate in reference to the defendant, thus putting off many people who would successfully win their cases through the insanity defense (Farrell, 2016). The “M’Naghten Rules” need to be interpreted with the help of medical practitioners or professionals to determine the severity of the defendant condition at the time they committed the offense and they type of condition they suffered to ensure that the law is effectively applied in the interest of common good for the defendant and the victims. On the other hand, the law needs to use socially acceptable and politically correct terms in reference to insanity and automatism to eliminate the stigma associated with insanity among the people. This approaches that the people will argue their cases on the doctrines of “M’Naghten Rules” to effectively defend their case.
Analysis, evaluation and application of legal theory
The insanity and automatism legal theories form the defense foundation in cases where the defendant committed crimes due to different internal and external factors. The application of the legal theory, in this case, can be evaluated from the evaluation of different case laws argued and decided using the “M’Naghten Rules.” It is vital to note that the disease of mind determination is more of a legal question as opposed to being a medical condition (Mackay, 2020). The legal question means that the insanity and automatism defenses are made based on the ordinary rules’ interpretation. In this case, any disease or condition that affects the body’s normal functioning and the mind is referred to as a disease of the mind; it does not have to be necessarily the disease affecting the brain. This approach makes the term disease of the mind to cover a wide range of conditions.
Numerous court cases can be evaluated and accessed to show the application of the insanity and automatism defenses. In this case, in the case of R v Burgess in 1991, Burgess attacked his friend Katrina while he was sleepwalking (statute). Burgess hit Katrina with a bottle and then picked up the video recorder and hit her head (Federman, 2013). In this case, the Crown Court argued that Burgess was innocent for the assault accusation because of insanity. The court ordered that Burges be detained in a psychiatrist hospital. The judge argued that sleeping was normal, but sleepwalking and causing violence while it was not normal. Therefore, Burgess causes a crime due to internal factors without his knowledge, and he was out of control of his actions; thus, the court found her not guilty but recommended psychiatric care to prevent such occurrences from occurring in the future. Additionally, under the British House of Lord, the case of R v Sullivan shows the application of the M’Naghten rule. In this case, Sullivan, the defendant, had an epileptic patient since his childhood was involved in hitting his friend during an epileptic seizure episode (Bird New, 2009). Upon recovery, the defendant could only recall that he was standing at a window with the victim lying on the floor with head injuries. The defendant was charged with assault, where the judge ruled in favor of the defendant, citing the incident occurred due to a disease of mind suffered from a post-epileptic seizure. Therefore, in both cases, the judge ruled in favor of the defendant by evaluating the causes of the purported violation of laws, thus establishing the violation due to the internal factors beyond the control of the defendants since they were related to the disease of the mind.
Logical and coherent argument handling cases where defendants unable to understand or control their criminal conduct
The M’Naghten rules provide insanity as criminal defense, but the success of the defendant is dependent on their ability and capability to prove the different aspects of the rule that include disease of the mind, defect of reason and the unawareness that their acts were wrong (Berman, 2016). The M’Naghten rules are driven towards ensuring that persons who find themselves in violation of different laws and rules due to their internal conditions or circumstances out of their control are protected from being found guilty. Thus, they are prescribed as not guilty despite their involvement in a crime.
The disease of mind entails the differences existing between being legal and medically insane. The court decision on insanity is made under the law and its interpretation, evidence and procedure (Mackay, 2020). In this case, any disease or condition that negatively affects the mind’s function is considered in cases as a contributing factor to one engaging in a crime. In the case of R v Hennessy, the defendant was accused of taking a vehicle without the owner’s consent. The defendant suffered from diabetes and had not taken insulin for three days, affecting his state of mind. The judge ruled that the condition disrupted the defendant’s mind; thus, he was sane and found not guilty.
The defect of reason element means that the defendant’s disease of mind must cause the defect of reason such that they cannot tell what they are doing in terms of nature and quality. In this case, the defendant loses their power of reasoning objectively, thus leading them to violate the law.
Lastly, the defendant or the accused must lack the knowledge that their acts are legally wrong. The fact that the defendants are unaware that their acts contradict the law makes them violate unknowingly (Loughnan and Ward, 2014). For instance, the case of T v Windle of 1952 was defense based on insanity was dismissed, for he knew his actions were wrong. The defendant suffered from mental illness but knowingly gave his wife a fatal dose of aspirin. The insanity defense was not accepted since there was no evidence and that the defendant knew that what he was doing was wrong.
Conclusion
The act of not criminalizing the conduct of defendants that cannot control or understand their acts of violating the law is addressed under the M’Naghten rules to ensure that such persons are protected from the law. In this regard, their defense is founded on insanity and automatism since it would be legally wrong to convict such individuals. Instead, the court finds alternative measures of handling them, such as recommending them to mental hospitals or psychiatric care. Additionally, the burden of proving insanity is left to the defendant where their case is dismissed when they prove the defense of insanity by showing a disease of the mind, defect of reason, and lack of knowledge of their acts’ illegality.
References
Books
Journals
Statute

The complexity of Information Systems Research in the Digital World

The complexity of Information Systems Research in the Digital World
Introduction
Complexity is an increasing emerging aspect of the digital world. Some of the emerging technologies developments that exhibit complexity include robotic process automation, algorithm decision-making, Internet of things global digital infrastructure, and other digitally enable networks. These technological phenomenon fuel complexity in the digital world by enhancing hyper connections and mutual dependencies among organizations and processes. However, wicked problems that are caused by digitalization. It worth noting that complexity organizations and individuals in all dimensions. In the digital world, complexity new challenges and opportunities for information system research. This paper seeks to analyze an article focused on the complexity of IS in the digital world. It will define diverse emerging technology as a note in the article. The paper will also determine the impact of the emerging technologies on organizations and the steps that organizations can undertake to reduce the digitalization burden. The article’s name being analyzed is “Complexity and Information Systems Research in the Emerging Digital World.”

Emerging Technologies Noted in the article and how they are impacting organizations
Digital transformation is one of the emerging trends in business organizations. There are notable new technologies explored in the article, which are influencing organizations in diverse ways. One of the emerging exhibited in this article is the existence of microprocessors. Large and small devices are currently sufficiently powered by microprocessors and connected by the internet, almost all organizations. Most of these devices integrated with artificial intelligence (IA) engines, and they can act and operate on their own. IA is an emerging technology that allows for the simulation of intelligence processes of humans. It is a combined attribute of science and computer that allows information systems intelligent and human functions, make decisions, and solve problems. For instance, the article notes that organizations are using autonomous vehicles, which can interact and understand traffic signals amid vehicles driven by human beings. Generally, Artificial Intelligence applications that apply machine learning can take data and convert into actionable. However, the application is complex and expensive because it is expensive to process large amounts of data required by IA programing.
Moreover, social networks enable individuals in organizations to become an internet content creator. Generated content can be mashed with other prevailing content and shared among other users. Other digital platforms like Airbnb and Uber enables millions to connect worldwide. Another emerging technology is cloud computing technology, which entails computing services, such as databases, servers. Software, networking, among others over the internet. This technology has fostered faster innovation and economies of scale through various algorithms. Such examples elaborate some of the critical emerging technologies used by organizations in the current century, provided in the article. These technologies have enhanced social, technical systems that are critically changing the way organizations operate.
However, Change in technology is a dynamic process that causes dynamic complexity. These complexities regarding the emerging technologies impose critical challenges for both small scale and large scale organizations. This is because there is a need for enterprises to adapt to changing technologies while maintaining internal alignment constantly. Therefore organizations can use Enterprise architecture to reduce the burden of digitalization. This method helps cope with challenges associated complexity of technologies. It also enhances the management of information system and ensuring they are in line with business elements found in complex organizations.
Conclusion
In conclusion, digital transformation presents both opportunities and challenges in organizations in various industries. Organizations face diverse challenges in managing the associated complexity. Therefore, Enterprise Architecture is leveraged to align the transformation with business elements and help manage the complexity. It helps organizations transform and manage their architecture.

MIS602 Data Modelling & Database Design

ASSESSMENT
Subject Code and Title BRIEF
MIS602 Data Modelling & Database Design
Assessment
Reflective Research Report
Individual/Group
Individual
Length
Three Thousand Word Limit
Learning Outcomes
a, b, c, d
Submission Friday 11:59 PM AEST/AEDT of Module 6.1 (week 11)
Weighting
40%
Total Marks
40 Marks
Context:
The MIS602 Data Modelling & Database Design subject is designed for you to progressively add to your understanding of data and database management and its relevance with in business context. It also introduces you to some of the key features of database management system and designing database systems that will feature in later modules of this topic. In order for you to do well in this subject, it is imperative that you undertake all of the learning activities in the modules. The learning activities are presented as a way of scaffolding your learning so that you can attempt the building blocks of the assessments and be in a safe environment to fail and to learn from them. Therefore, doing your learning activities and seeking feedback from them from peers and from the learning facilitator is the single best way of preparing for doing well in this assessment.
Scenario:
The scenario for this assessment is a multi-specialty hospital system, the Royal Rundle Hospital (RRH), that provides a broad range of services to the community which include surgical, maternity, obstetric care, dialysis, emergency, mental health, aged and palliative care, allied health services and a 24-hour emergency department. The RRH has been serving in the region for over 50 years and has been using paper-based forms and documents to store and manage all the data with some use of spreadsheets that started not so long ago. Now that the management of RRH wants to take the advantages of Information Technology to maintain and manage the records of the various aspects of the hospital system more efficiently, they have put out a Request for Proposals (RFP) for appropriately qualified consultants to undertake a body of work that would help to scope the data requirements for such a system. With your success in your Torrens University Australia degree so far, and other similar projects that have garnered you some sustained success in the eyes of the profession and community, you have been shortlisted among no less than 10 other consultancies. There are expectations from them, then, as to the standard of report you will produce.
The management of the RRH has provided you with an overview and description of the hospital system as below-
Overview:
The Royal Rundle Hospital (RRH) is a multi-specialty hospital that includes a number of departments, rooms, doctors, nurses, compounders, and other staff working in the hospital. Patients having different kinds of ailments come to the hospital and get checkup done from the relevant doctors. If required they are admitted in the hospital and discharged after treatment. The hospital maintains the records of various departments, rooms, and doctors in the hospital besides the most important records of the regular patients, patients admitted in the hospital, the checkup of patients done by the doctors, the patients that have been operated, and patients discharged from the hospital.
Description:
In RRH, there are many departments like Orthopedic, Pathology, Emergency, Dental, Gynecology, Anesthetics, I.C.U., Blood Bank, Operation Theater, Laboratory, M.R.I., Neurology, Cardiology, Cancer Department, Corpse, etc. There is an OPD where patients come and get a card (that is, entry card of the patient) for check up from the relevant doctor. After making entry in the card, they go to the relevant doctor’s room and the doctor checks up their ailments. According to the ailments, the doctor either prescribes medicine or admits the patient in the relevant department. The patient may choose either private or general room according to his/her need. But before getting admission in the hospital, the patient has to fulfill certain formalities of the hospital like room charges, etc. After the treatment is completed, the doctor discharges the patient. Before discharging from the hospital, the patient again has to complete certain formalities of the hospital like balance charges, test charges, operation charges (if any), blood charges, doctors’ charges, etc.
Next, the management talks about the doctors of the hospital. There are two types of the doctors in the hospital, namely, regular doctors and call-on doctors. Regular doctors are those doctors who come to the hospital daily. Call-on doctors are those doctors who are called by the hospital if the relevant regular doctor is not available.
Instructions:
The management believes and understands that the benefits of an IT solution to manage and maintain their records are enormous and hopes to gain a thorough insight that should come from a lot of forethought and design elements fed into it before it could be seriously considered by them.
The RRH management seeks consultation on what the data requirements of such a system might be.
There are two objectives of this assessment:
1. For the purposes of the client, the Royal Rundle Hospital (RRH) management, you are to produce a design brief and,
2. For the purposes of the assessment, you are to produce a reflection.
So, this written submission should expertly mix a consultative style—that is, providing a solution to the problem as outlined by the client—with a deep reflection on what you have learned in the subject and the potential for such an automated system. You will need to use your judgement on this, it is likely to take several drafts to get it right. The deliverable for this assessment is plainly:
You are required to create a consultative report that addresses the data requirements of the proposed Royal Rundle Hospital (RRH) System as well as commenting on the feasibility of such a solution, given what you learned in the subject. Following instructions will assist you in completion of the task.
Some hints for you to heed while you develop and write your assessment:
• Consider all aspects of the hospital’s operations and flows of data and then explore the benefits and challenges that an automated system may present in regard to effectiveness, efficiency an also adaptation issues, when implemented.
• The RRH management has not provided any assumptions and you should list these if
your proposal and reflection are to be considered cogent.
Based on your learning from the course modules and previous assignments, you are expected to come up with data requirements and a logical design of the system and a brief commentary on the design.
Submission Instructions:
This consultative research and reflective report will be in a format that you choose and there are no prescriptions for what to include or what not to include. You will need to research consultant-grade reports (look for consulting reports form the Big Four firms as a guide and use them as the basis for their content, articulation presentation standard).
Besides your research and reflection, you should include logical data requirements in a design summary that includes appropriate Entity- Relationship (ER) Diagram replete with connectivity and cardinality considerations, and the database schema with the final set of Relations normalised to 3NF (Note: you do not need to include the normalisation steps). You should list any and all assumptions used in your report as well as any limitations that the reader should consider as they read your report.
You should treat the prescribed word limit as something you cannot breach as there is no plus-or- minus 10 per cent ascribed in this assessment. The reality of consultant-grade reports is that any that breach the requirements are rejected and no reasoning is provided to the consultant. As you are preparing for your professional life, treat this requirement as the same in this subject and that any report that breaches the word limit will not be marked.
Requests for extensions must be compliant with the university policy and must be applied for before the due date. Include in your application a full draft of your assessment as this draft may be what is assessed if the extension request is denied.
Submit your report to the submission point in Blackboard prior to the due date. In accordance with university policy, late assessments will attract a 10% of available grade penalty for every day late, up to a maximum of 5 days, after which the assessment will not be marked.
Please note that requests for resubmissions of this assessment will not be considered.

Learning Rubric: Assessment Three
Assessment
Attributes
Fail (Unacceptable) 0-49% Pass
(Functional)
50-64% Credit
(Proficient) 65-74% Distinction
(Advanced)
75 -84% High Distinction
(Exceptional)
85-100%
Understanding of the
Data requirements
30% Demonstrates limited understanding of the data requirements Fair understanding of the data requirements. May neglect to provide resources or that these are cursorily provided without reference to specific areas in the source. Good understanding of the data requirements demonstrated. May provide a limited number of sources the peer can use to develop their technique from. Very good understanding of the data requirements demonstrated. Makes recommendations to other external sources the peer can access to develop their understanding. Outstanding understanding of the data requirements demonstrated through recommendation of other sources with specific references to components of it that the peer will benefit from.
Capture of key entities and their relationships
40% Less than 50% entities and relationships are completed 50-64% entities and relationships completed 65-74% entities and relationships completed 75-84% entities and relationships completed 85-100% entities and relationships completed
Effective
communication
30% Difficult to understand for audience, no logical/clear structure, poor flow of ideas, argument lacks supporting evidence. Audience cannot follow the line of reasoning. Information, arguments and evidence are presented in a way that is not always clear and logical. Line of reasoning is often difficult to follow. Information, arguments and evidence are well presented, mostly clear flow of ideas and arguments. Line of reasoning is easy to follow. Information, arguments and evidence are very well presented; the presentation is logical, clear and well supported by evidence. Demonstrates cultural sensitivity. Expertly presented; the presentation is logical, persuasive, and well supported by evidence, demonstrating a clear flow of ideas and arguments. Engages and sustains audience’s interest in the topic, demonstrates high levels of cultural sensitivity.
MIS602 Assign 3 Page 4 of 4

MIS500 Foundations of Information Systems Assessment Reflective Report

ASSESSMENT 3 BRIEF
Subject Code and Title MIS500 Foundations of Information Systems
Assessment Reflective Report
Individual/Group Individual
Length 1500 words (+/- 10%
Learning Outcomes The Subject Learning Outcomes demonstrated by successful completion of the task below include:
d) Effectively communicate and demonstrate understanding of the importance of ethical and professional standards in own career and professional future.
Submission Due by 11:55 PM AEST Friday of Module 6.1 (Week 11)
Intensive class: 11:55 PM AEST Friday of Module 6.1 (Week 6)
Weighting 35%
Total Marks 35 marks
Task Summary
This assessment task requires you to reflect on your experiences in MIS500 this trimester by following a four-step process to gain insights into the work you have done and how it relates to your own career and life more broadly. In doing so, you will need to produce a weekly journal to record your learning and then as the trimester comes to a close reflect on these experiences and submit a final reflection of 1500 words (+/- 10%) that will include the weekly journal as an appendices.
Context
This is an individual assignment that tracks your growth as a student of Information Systems over the trimester. It is scaffolded around your weekly learning activities. Completing the activities and seeking input from your peers and the learning facilitator is essential for you to achieve a positive result in this subject. Before you start this assessment, be sure that you have completed the learning activities in all of the modules. This reflective report gives you the opportunity to communicate your understanding of how information systems relate to your career and future.
Task Instructions
1. During Module 1 – 5, you were ask to produce a weekly journal to record your learnings each week. Based on these weekly journals, please write a 1500 word reflective report about your experience.
2. You are required to follow the four steps of Kolb’s learning cycle when writing the reflective report.
You will keep a learning journal throughout the trimester. Each week as you complete the learning activities you record your experience in spreadsheet or word document.
A suggested format for the learning journal is as follows:
Date Learning Activity Impact (what it means to you) Evidence (attach record of activity). This might be a set of slides, word document or pictures of work you
have completed in class
For each day in your learning journey, write the date and then the learning activity you engaged in. Detail what impact the learning had on you and then include any evidence you might like to keep for use later on. This journal should be appended to this assessment when you submit it.
(source: Kolb DA 1984, Experiential Learning experience as a source of learning and development, Prentice Hall,
New Jersey.)
Step 1
Concrete experience – Keep a learning journal
The first step is to keep a learning journal for the trimester (Modules 1.1 through to 5.2 as described above. You should have already completed this step by now.
Step 2
Reflective observation – Summarise what happened
You should now be able to comment on your experiences this trimester. This exercise is not a list of what you have done but rather an observation of what you have learned – were there any themes that arose from your journal? The point of a learning journal is to start a discussion on what the key concepts and skills you have learned and acquired during the course of this subject. This is because we often don’t stop to think and reflect on what we have learned
Step 3
Abstract conceptualization – Analyse what this means
The next step is to analyse what you have found. Reflective practice is a process of thinking about new experiences with a view of learning. It is a form of personal response to new experiences, situations, events or information. What new knowledge have you gained in response to this exercise? And what does this information mean? You are expected to reflect at a deep level here. This means that it is not just about explaining what you have done in this subject rather it requires you to think about your personal beliefs, your background and the way you perceive the world around you. Did you learn anything in this subject that challenged you or change the way you thought about information systems or business?
Step 4
Active experimentation – New action
The final step is to discuss what you plan to do with this new knowledge. These new insights may lead to a change of thinking or behaviour. In what ways? Set yourself some specific goals for your future studies or career.
1. You are required to write this assessment in a report format using the following headings:
2. Introduction
3. Reflective Observation
4. Abstract conceptualization
5. Active experimentation
6. Conclusion
7. Appendix of learning journal (with evidence)
Please note that simply describing what you have done each week will not be sufficient to pass this assessment. You are expected to go ‘deeper’ and analyse what this subject meant to you and your future.
Referencing
Formal citation of sources is not required. However, specific reference to your own experiences must be made. It is essential that you use appropriate APA style for citing and referencing research if you do make reference other work. Please see more information on referencing here http://library.laureate.net.au/research_skills/referencing
Please refer to the marking rubric to ensure you address all the assessment criteria.
Submission Instructions
Please submit ONE MSWord document (.doc or .docx) via the Assessment 3 section found in the main navigation menu of the subject’s Blackboard site. The Learning Facilitator will provide feedback via the Grade Centre in the LMS portal. Feedback can be viewed in My Grades.
Academic Integrity Declaration
I declare that except where I have referenced, the work I am submitting for this assessment task is my own work. I have read and am aware of Torrens University Australia Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure viewable online at http://www.torrens.edu.au/policies-and-forms
I am aware that I need to keep a copy of all submitted material and their drafts, and I will do so accordingly.
Assessment Rubric
Assessment Attributes Fail
(Yet to achieve minimum standard) 0-49% Pass
(Functional)
50-64% Credit
(Proficient) 65-74% Distinction
(Advanced)
75-84% High Distinction
(Exceptional)
85-100%
Demonstrated understanding of the
learning cycle/reflection
model
Percentage for this criterion = 10%
No clear understanding of Kolb’s learning cycle. Has not clearly demonstrated an understanding of Kolb’s learning cycle. The four stages are not articulated and appropriate to the discussion. Demonstrated understanding of Kolb’s learning cycle. The four stages are clearly articulated and somewhat add to the discussion. Demonstrated understanding of Kolb’s learning cycle. The four stages are clearly articulated and appropriate to the discussion. Demonstrated understanding of Kolb’s learning cycle. The four stages are clearly articulated to a high level and appropriate to the discussion.
Reflection and analysis of own experiences demonstrating independent thinking and expressing meaningful insights.
Percentage for this
criterion = 25%
The learning journey has been cursorily put together and needs significant work in demonstrating how the subject has developed the student.
The learning journey has a passable level of detail; more work is needed to demonstrate how the subject has changed the student as a result of undergoing it.
An inadequate, unclear, unfocussed or overview which does not include analysis or personalization or express meaningful insights The learning journey shows an average level of depth; there may not be any vulnerability or detail in how they have changed as a result of undergoing the subject
The learning journey has a good level of depth and the student has shown a hint of vulnerability as well as good detail in how they have grown as a person and as a professional.
Reflection and analysis of own experiences is personalized, and to a certain extent
demonstrates independent thinking and expresses
insights
The learning journey is chronicled to an appropriate depth and the student has shown vulnerability as well as significant detail in growing as a person as a professional.
Reflection and analysis of own experiences is consistently personalized, demonstrates independent thinking and expresses meaningful insights
Evidence of changed thinking and/or goal The learning journey has been cursorily put The scope of the report needs significant The scope of the learning journey may need to be The learning journey has a scope that is good and The learning journey narrative has been
Assessment Attributes Fail
(Yet to achieve minimum standard) 0-49% Pass
(Functional)
50-64% Credit
(Proficient) 65-74% Distinction
(Advanced)
75-84% High Distinction
(Exceptional)
85-100%
setting due to new understanding of behaviour
Percentage for this
criterion = 20%
together and needs significant work in scoping and recounting how the student has developed.
Goal setting was not attempted.
adjustment and the student needs further work in demonstrating how they have changed as a result of undergoing the subject.
Little attempt was made to set goals based on the knowledge attained from reflection. adjusted or the account provided may need more imagination as to how the subject developed the student.
Goals were set for the future includes a very good account of how the student changed as a person and as a professional.
Based on this reflection measureable goals were set for the future. scoped well and includes a complete account of how the student changed, both as a person and a professional.
Based on this reflection measureable goals were set for the future.
Journal appendix
Percentage for this criterion = 30%
It may be obvious that the student has not completed self-directed study or completed the learning activities. Significant more work is needed to demonstrate the work the student did in the subject.
Little or no evidence is presented.
The student can be seen to have made an attempt to refer to work they have done in their study of the subject to illustrate their
journey
Module 1.1 – 5.2 documented with some missing. Evidence is not well presented.
The assessment includes a good number of references to previous work completed in the subject to illustrate their journey.
Module 1.1 – 5.2 present (although some may be missing) and well documented. Evidence is robust and well presented with some gaps.
The assessment includes a very good number and frequency of references to previously completed work, to illustrate their journey.
Module 1.1 – 5.2 present and well documented. Evidence is robust and well presented.
The assessment includes numerous references to the learning journal and learning activities throughout.
Module 1.1 – 5.2 present and well documented. Evidence is robust and well presented.
Assessment Attributes Fail
(Yet to achieve minimum standard) 0-49% Pass
(Functional)
50-64% Credit
(Proficient) 65-74% Distinction
(Advanced)
75-84% High Distinction
(Exceptional)
85-100%
Effective
Communication
(Written)
Percentage for this
criterion = 15%
Presents information.
Specialised language and terminology is rarely or inaccurately employed.
Meaning is repeatedly obscured by errors in the communication of ideas, including errors in structure, sequence, spelling, grammar, punctuation and/or the acknowledgment of sources.
Communicates in a readable manner that largely adheres to the given format.
Generally employs specialised language & terminology with accuracy.
Meaning is sometimes difficult to follow.
Information, arguments and evidence are structured and sequenced in a way that is not always clear and logical.
Some errors are evident in spelling, grammar and/or punctuation.
Communicates in a coherent and readable manner that adheres to the given format.
Accurately employs specialised language and
terminology.
Meaning is easy to follow.
Information, arguments and evidence are structured and sequenced in a way that is clear and logical.
Occasional minor errors
present in spelling, grammar and/or punctuation.
Communicates coherently and concisely in a manner that adheres to the given format.
Accurately employs a wide range of specialised
language and terminology.
Engages audience interest.
Information, arguments and evidence are structured and sequenced in a way that is, clear and persuasive.
Spelling, grammar and punctuation are free from errors.
Communicates eloquently. Expresses meaning coherently, concisely and creatively within the given format.
Discerningly selects and precisely employs a wide range of specialised language and terminology.
Engages and sustains audience’s interest. Information, arguments and evidence are insightful, persuasive and expertly presented.
Spelling, grammar and punctuation are free from errors.

BUSN112: Managing Markets

ASSESSMENT GUIDE
BUSN112: Managing Markets, Semester 2 2020
Assessment 3
Individual Market Analysis Business Report
Weighting [40%] Why this assessment?
This assessment provides you with the opportunity to appraise a data set using learnt descriptive statistical skills in order to demonstrate basic applied understanding of such skills in a marketing context. This assessment will also enable you to demonstrate the ability to interpret numeric data, and derive market or consumer meaning from it.
What are the types of employability skills that I will acquire upon completion of this assessment?
Skill Type
Developed critical and analytical thinking ? Developed ability to solve complex problems ?
Developed confidence to learn independently ? Developed written communication skills ? Developed knowledge in the field of marketing ? Developed work-related knowledge and skills ?
Developed effective research skills ?
Assessment Overview:
Due date: 10 November 2020, 8am
The submission system/Turnitin opens on 3 Nov, 8am. Please access the Turnitin box through a LEO site named -EXAM-BUSN112-National-Semester 2, 2020- on the left side of your LEO page and click on the main exam tile.
Main exam tile will be accessible from 19 Oct.
Weighting: 40%
Length and/or format: 2250-word report
Learning outcomes assessed LO3, LO4
Graduate attributes assessed GA5, GA8, GA9
How to submit: Turnitin created by the Examination Office (Access through a LEO site named -EXAM-BUSN112-NationalSemester 2, 2020 – on the left side of your LEO page and click on the main exam tile).
Main exam tile will be accessible from 19 Oct.
Return of assignment: Not returned
Assessment criteria: See the last page of this document
Context
In assessment 1, you were asked to introduce us to your gym and outline the legal and economic dimensions that were relevant. Then in assessment 2 you explored the key marketing considerations in the form of a persuasive presentation. Now, in your final piece, you will use collected data to justify your marketing strategy and present this in a formal business report.
Instructions
Prior to your assignment being drafted, you will be asked to participate in a class-wide anonymous survey, identifying your opinions about gyms. The results of this survey will be provided to you as a data set, which you can use for a statistical analysis to justify and support your marketing strategy identified in assessment 2.
In your report you will discuss the key identifiers from the dataset provided on LEO that you have chosen to support your marketing strategy. These should be supported by data and your knowledge of statistics. Identifiers may include gender, income, gym opinions, etc.
Consider the following questions:
1. What does the data tell you about the planned locality of your gym?
2. How does this support your strategy?
You may like to draw on additional sources to support these ideas. Be sure to indicate appropriate theories and their applications.
You should create tables and graphs to support your points, but these must be labelled and referenced clearly. Though you may find existing graphs and tables about your market, consider these as inspirational only and create your own using the data set you have been given.
Report writing is formal and intended for professional audiences. You will need to adapt the language you use to suit the audience.
Structure
Title Page Not included in word count
Executive Summary
(approximately 200 words) Not included in word count
Table of Contents Not included in word count
Introduction
(approximately 200 words) Clearly identify which key identifiers you have analysed in your report
Remind us of the key details about your gym
Main body (use subheadings here)
(approximately 1850 words) Discuss the key identifiers
Use headings for each section and sub section
Conclusion
(approximately 200 words)
References For students in the Peter Faber Business School, you are required to use the Harvard style of referencing. If you are in a different School, you are welcome to use the referencing style you have been taught; however, you must indicate this at the top of your reference list.
Appendices Not included in word count
Only use this if you need to provide additional information for reference
How do I submit?
• Electronic submission using LEO through Turnitin (Please access the Turnitin box through a LEO site named -EXAM-BUSN112-National-Semester 2, 2020” on the left side of your LEO page and click on the main exam tile.)
• Please include your student ID number and your name in the assignment file name.
• Submit one soft copy via LEO (link on unit site under Assessment). Please ensure you save a copy of your document before submitting it.
• Include the checklist below in your assessment document
• You must keep a backup copy of every assignment you submit, until the marked assignment has been returned to you. In the unlikely event that one of your assignments is misplaced, you will need to submit your backup copy.
• Any work you submit may be checked by electronic or other means for the purposes of detecting collusion and/or plagiarism.
Checklist for students to submit along with their assignment
My submitted assignment assessment is within the specified word limit (+/-10%) ?
I have included references using the specified referencing style ?
I have correctly cited all my sources and references ?
I have formatted my assessment as per the specifications ?
I have checked my Turnitin assessment to ensure the similarity report is acceptable and explainable ?
I will be able to supply the process output, if required by my lecturer to prove this is my own work (e.g. screen dump of my search and retrieval of journal articles, etc.) ?
I have completed proof reading and checked for spelling and grammar ?
I have submitted my work before the due date/time ?
Some Helpful Websites and Resources
• How to use Excel’s Descriptive Statistics Tool
• How to run a t test two sample assuming unequal variances in Excel
• Mean, Median and Mode
• Measures of spread: range, variance & standard deviation
• Primary and Secondary Data
• Representing Data
• Skewness
• Standard Deviation – Explained and Visualized
• Types of Data
Other Resources on all of these topics can be found in the PowerPoint slides, textbook and workshop videos
Who can help me?
Academic skills Unit (ASU)
Studiosity
Post a question to the LEO discussion forum
Seek a consultation with one of the following lecturers:
• Dr. Andrew Papadimos (NLIC) – contact via LEO
• Laura Papadimos – contact via LEO
I’m having problems
SC: Application for Special Consideration Complete this form if you wish to be exempted from academic penalty because your study has been affected by unforeseen circumstances.
EX: Application for extension of time for submission of an Assessment Task Complete this form if you wish to apply for extension of time for submission of this Assessment Task.
Complete this form if you wish to apply for extension of time for submission of this Assessment Task.
Referencing
All referencing should be in ACU Harvard style; however if you are coming from another faculty, you may choose to use your usual referencing style. If this is the case you must indicate at the top of your reference list what referencing style you are using (e.g. APA, MLA, Chicago, etc).
Please ensure your assignment makes use of in-text citations and a reference list. Missing citations or references is equivalent to plagiarism.
Criteria
The full criteria are compiled in a rubric, which can be found on the following page/s.
Rubric for Assessment 3: Market Analysis Business Report – 40% Weighting
Learning Outcomes Criteria Standards
Below Expectations Meets expectations Exceeds Expectations
NN (0-49) PA (50-64) CR (65-74) DI (75-84) HD (85-100)
GA5
LO3
Weight: 20 marks
TL=4
Learning Stage I Different statistical techniques
understood and used to interpret the data for decision making No descriptive analysis is presented. No graphs to demonstrate descriptive
analysis are presented. No
required primary analysis is provided nor clearly demonstrated in tables. No statistical methods to test the hypothesis are correctly identified and used. Results are neither clearly labelled nor clearly presented in tables. No results of the primary analysis are correctly interpreted. No results of hypotheses testing are correctly interpreted. Based on the interpretation of results, no recommendations for the company are presented.
(0 to 9.9 marks)
Some descriptive analysis is presented. Some graphs to demonstrate descriptive analysis are presented. Some primary analysis is provided and clearly demonstrated in tables. Some statistical methods to test the hypothesis are correctly identified and used. Results are adequately labelled and clearly presented in tables. Some results of the primary analysis are correctly interpreted. Some results of hypotheses testing are correctly interpreted. Based on the interpretation of results, adequate recommendations for the company are presented.
(10 to 12.7 marks)
Credible descriptive analysis is presented. Some graphs to demonstrate descriptive analysis are presented. Credible primary analysis is provided and clearly demonstrated in tables. Some statistical methods to test the hypothesis are correctly identified and used. Results are credibly labelled and clearly presented in tables. Some results of the primary analysis are correctly interpreted. Some results of hypotheses testing are correctly interpreted. Based on the interpretation of results, credible recommendations for the company are presented.
(12.8 to 14.7 marks)
Distinctive descriptive analysis is presented. More than a few graphs to demonstrate descriptive analysis are presented. Distinctive primary analysis is provided and clearly demonstrated in tables. Several statistical methods to test the hypothesis are correctly identified and used. Results are distinctively labelled and clearly presented in tables. Most results of the primary analysis are correctly interpreted. Most results of hypotheses testing are correctly interpreted. Based on the interpretation of results, distinctive recommendations for the company are presented.
(14.8 to 16.8 marks)
Highly distinctive analysis is presented. All graphs to demonstrate descriptive analysis are presented. All required primary analysis is provided and clearly demonstrated in tables. All statistical methods to test the hypothesis are correctly identified and used. All results are clearly labelled and clearly presented in tables. All of the results of the primary analysis are correctly interpreted. All of the results of hypotheses testing are correctly interpreted. Based on the interpretation of results, highly distinctive recommendations for the company are presented.
(16.9 to 20 marks)
GA8
LO3
Weight: 4 marks TL=4
Learning Stage I and D Locating, organising , analysing and
synthesising relevant statistical
information and
data into business report Failure to locate, organise, analyse and synthesise relevant statistical
information and data into
business report .
(0 to 1.9 marks) Adequately located, organised, analysed and synthesised relevant statistical information and data into business report .
(2 to 2.5 marks) Credibly located, organised, analysed and synthesised relevant statistical information and data into business report .
(2.6 to 2.9 marks) Distinctively located, organised, analysed and synthesised relevant statistical information and data into business report .
(3 to 3.3 marks) Highly distinctively located, organised, analysed and synthesised relevant statistical information and data into business report .
(3.4 to 4 marks)
6
GA9
LO4
Weight: 16 marks
TL=3
Learning Stage I and D Communication
skills
(style, tone, technical writing
skills, referencing)
(6 marks)
Information presented is incoherent or in a style inappropriate to the task. Significant errors in grammar, punctuation and spelling.
Most or all sources have not been references using in-text citations and a reference list, or there are significant style issues.
(0 to 2.9 marks) Information presented is generally coherent and, in a style, appropriate to the task.
Grammar, punctuation and
spelling is generally correct, with some errors.
All sources are referenced using in-text citations and a reference list with some general errors in style.
(3.0 to 3.8 marks) Information presented in a coherent manner and in a style that is engaging and appropriate to the task. Little error in grammar, punctuation and spelling. All sources are referenced using in-text citations and a reference list with some errors in style.
(3.9 to 4.4 marks)
Information presented in a highly coherent manner and in a style that is engaging and appropriate to the task. There may be minor errors in grammar, punctuation and spelling.
All sources are referenced using in-text citations and a reference list with some minor errors in style.
(4.5 to 5 marks Information presented in a clear and extremely coherent manner, and in a style that is
engaging and highly appropriate to the task. No errors in grammar, punctuation and spelling. All sources are referenced using in-text citations and a reference list with no, or very minor errors in style.
(5.1 to 6 marks)
Notes: GA – Graduate Attribute; LO – Learning Outcome; TL – Taxonomy Level (or level of complexity) (see Bloom’s Taxonomy); Learning Stage – Introduced (I), Developed (D), Assured (A)

BLAW1002 SEMESTER 2 2020 – ASSESSMENT 3: LEGAL CASE STUDY

BLAW1002 SEMESTER 2 2020 – ASSESSMENT 3: LEGAL CASE STUDY – SHORT QUESTION AND ANSWER (40 MARKS)
For this assessment, students are to apply the concepts taught in the law modules for the unit (modules 9, 10 and 11) to a case study (Commonwealth Bank of Australia: The Unwitting Mule) and answer four short answer questions. To best answer these questions, students may be required to research beyond the principles taught in the lectures and tutorials, and will be required to reference any external material that is used to form the substance of their answers.
In breaking down the marks that are available for this assessment, each question is worth 9 marks for a total of 36 marks for the content portion of the assignment. The remaining 4 marks are awarded for the use of referencing and the structure / presentation of assignment submissions. Students are to integrate a completed cover page (a template is provided on blackboard) into their assignment document and submit their assignment file in soft copy format to a turnitin link in blackboard. A hard copy version of your assignment is not required to be submitted to your lecturer or tutor.
Assessment Questions
Read the Commonwealth Bank of Australia: The Unwitting Mule case study and answer the following questions:
1. What areas of law are pertinent to this case study? Describe what the identified areas of law cover, and explain how they are relevant to the issues raised in the case study. (9 marks)
2. What is the business structure of the Commonwealth Bank of Australia (CBA)? What does this structure say of the duties that the bank’s directors owe to its stakeholders, and how have the directors breached those duties by allowing the conduct that is detailed in the case study. (9 marks)
3. Describe the regulatory responsibility of AUSTRAC in the context of this case. What changes (if any) to the scope of their responsibility were brought about by the findings of the 2018 Royal Commission into the Banking sector. (9 marks)
4. What business risks were ignored by the CBA executives, and what good governance and compliance practices could have been implemented to alleviate these risks? (9 marks)
Below is the marking rubric which will be used to grade your submission:
Question 1 – Relevant areas of law 0 – 2 marks
Very limited knowledge of topic with significant gaps between what was covered and what answer should have addressed.
Answer shows no conceptual understanding, or ability to apply those concepts in answering the question. 2 – 4 marks
Limited knowledge of topic and will not have discussed relevant points in much detail.
Answer shows a general lack of conceptual understanding, or ability to apply those concepts in answering the question.
4 – 5 marks
Reasonable knowledge of topic but may not have discussed all relevant points in answer, or what was discussed often lacks detail.
Demonstrates a
reasonable conceptual understanding and a sound ability to apply those concepts in answering the question. 5 – 7 marks
Good knowledge of topic but may not have discussed all relevant points in answer, or will have discussed all relevant points but will occasionally lack detail.
Mostly demonstrates a high level conceptual understanding and a very good ability to apply those concepts in answering the question. 7 – 9 marks
Comprehensive/detailed knowledge of topic with discussion of all relevant points in answer. Consistently
demonstrates an excellent conceptual understanding and an outstanding ability to apply those concepts in answering the question.
/
9
Question 2 –
Business
Structure of
bank 0 – 2 marks
Very limited knowledge of topic with significant gaps between what was covered and what answer should have addressed.
Answer shows no conceptual understanding, or ability to apply 2 – 4 marks
Limited knowledge of topic and will not have discussed relevant points in much detail.
Answer shows a general lack of conceptual understanding, or ability to apply those concepts in 4 – 5 marks
Reasonable knowledge of topic but may not have discussed all relevant points in answer, or what was discussed often lacks detail.
Demonstrates a
reasonable conceptual understanding and a sound ability to apply 5 – 7 marks
Good knowledge of topic but may not have discussed all relevant points in answer, or will have discussed all relevant points but will occasionally lack detail.
Mostly demonstrates a high level conceptual understanding and a very good ability to apply those concepts in answering the question. 7 – 9 marks
Comprehensive/detailed knowledge of topic with discussion of all relevant points in answer. Consistently
demonstrates an excellent conceptual understanding and an outstanding ability to apply those concepts in answering the question.
/
9
those concepts in answering the question. answering the question.
those concepts in answering the question.
Question 3 –
Regulatory responsibility of
AUSTRAC 0 – 2 marks
Very limited knowledge of topic with significant gaps between what was covered and what answer should have addressed.
Answer shows no conceptual understanding, or ability to apply those concepts in answering the question. 2 – 4 marks
Limited knowledge of topic and will not have discussed relevant points in much detail.
Answer shows a general lack of conceptual understanding, or ability to apply those concepts in answering the question.
4 – 5 marks
Reasonable knowledge of topic but may not have discussed all relevant points in answer, or what was discussed often lacks detail.
Demonstrates a
reasonable conceptual understanding and a sound ability to apply those concepts in answering the question. 5 – 7 marks
Good knowledge of topic but may not have discussed all relevant points in answer, or will have discussed all relevant points but will occasionally lack detail.
Mostly demonstrates a high level conceptual understanding and a very good ability to apply those concepts in answering the question. 7 – 9 marks
Comprehensive/detailed knowledge of topic with discussion of all relevant points in answer. Consistently
demonstrates an excellent conceptual understanding and an outstanding ability to apply those concepts in answering the question.
/
9
Question 4 – Business risks,
Good Governance and Compliance 0 – 2 marks
Very limited knowledge of topic with significant gaps between what was covered and what answer should have addressed.
Answer shows no conceptual understanding, or 2 – 4 marks
Limited knowledge of topic and will not have discussed relevant points in much detail.
Answer shows a general lack of conceptual understanding, or ability to apply those concepts in 4 – 5 marks
Reasonable knowledge of topic but may not have discussed all relevant points in answer, or what was discussed often lacks detail.
Demonstrates a
reasonable conceptual understanding and a 5 – 7 marks
Good knowledge of topic but may not have discussed all relevant points in answer, or will have discussed all relevant points but will occasionally lack detail.
Mostly demonstrates a high level conceptual understanding and a very good ability to apply those 7 – 9 marks
Comprehensive/detailed knowledge of topic with discussion of all relevant points in answer. Consistently
demonstrates an excellent conceptual understanding and an outstanding ability to apply those concepts in answering the question.
/
9
ability to apply those concepts in answering the question. answering the question.
sound ability to apply those concepts in answering the question. concepts in answering the question.
Referencing/Str ucture/ Presentation 0 marks
Cover page not included.
Incoherent writing style with structure not appropriate to short answer format. Recurrent grammar, formatting and spelling mistakes.
No in-text referencing or reference list provided. 1 mark
Cover page not included. Largely incoherent writing style with structure not appropriate to short answer format. Recurrent grammar, formatting and spelling mistakes. Either in-text referencing or reference list missing. 2 marks
Cover page may / may not have been included. Good writing style with structure appropriate to short answer format.
Inconsistent grammar, formatting and spelling applied. In-text referencing and reference list incomplete or contains errors. 3 marks
Cover page included. Very good writing style with structure largely appropriate to short answer format. Grammar, formatting and spelling mostly accurate. In-
text referencing and reference list provided that accords with Chicago referencing system. 4 marks
Cover page included. Fluent writing style with structure appropriate to short answer format. Grammar, formatting and spelling accurate
(little to no mistakes).
In-text referencing and reference list provided that accords with Chicago referencing system.
/
4
Referencing and appropriate acknowledgement of sources
Most often errors in referencing are incidental or clearly inadvertent. In the event of a level one incident of plagiarism occurring, a student may be contacted by the University and required to undertake further training or remedial work in relation to referencing. Where the lack of correct referencing appears to contravene the University policy on plagiarism, the student’s paper will be referred to the Unit Coordinator and dealt with according to University policy. This may amount to academic misconduct.
An important aspect of the University Plagiarism Policy is recognition that not all plagiarism incidents are intentional or involves cheating. If students are not learning as expected, they will be made aware of their difficulties and helped to improve. Those who deliberately choose to cheat by way of plagiarism, however, will be identified and dealt with accordingly.
Students are strongly advised to understand their responsibilities in relation to correct referencing and should consult the unit outline and the referencing information in the Learning Hub section of the Blackboard site.
Format of assignments
Assignments cannot be handwritten and must comply with the following format requirements. Those assignments, which do not conform to these requirements without prior agreement of the unit coordinator, will either be returned to the student unmarked or will have marks deducted:
Document type: Word or pdf (pdf preferred).
Font: Arial or similar font – no smaller than 12 point in size.
Pages: Numbered in top or bottom margin.
Spacing: Appropriate line spacing and paragraph spacing.
Margins: At least 2.5 cm top, left, right & bottom.
Labelling of assignment file: Should include student’s Curtin ID number, their first and last names, and the title of the assignment (BLAW1002 Assessment 3 – Legal Case Study).
Presentation
A well-presented assessment will consider and meet the following criteria:
• Cover sheet (located on Blackboard under the ‘Assessment’ tab) must be completed and integrated into your assignment document (The system will only allow you to submit one file so you won’t be able to submit your cover page and assignment document separately).
• Appropriate sentence structure.
• Correct grammar, spelling and punctuation.
• Paragraph size and breaks appropriate.
• Consistent format.
• Appropriate use of headings and sub-headings.
• Within acceptable word limit.
• Appropriate referencing and acknowledgment of sources.
Word Limit
The total assignment should be a minimum of 2,500 words and not exceed 3,000 words.
Please provide a word count on your cover sheet. A penalty of 10% will be imposed on assignments that exceed the word limit. Markers however, have the discretion as to whether to apply the penalty for an additional 100 words, provided the discussion remains relevant. The assignment will not be assessed if it exceeds 3,250 words and will result in a ZERO mark.
The word count does not include the following:
• cover sheet;
• in-text referencing;
• referencing list; and
• headings or sub-headings.
Submission of Assignment Document
Please read the submission process carefully. Students should understand that compliance with instructions in relation to an assessment task is critical. Students MUST be aware that non-compliance with submission instructions can result in a mark of ZERO.
All assignments must be submitted by Friday, 6 November 2020 by 1PM (WST), unless an extension for legitimate reasons has been granted by the unit cocoordinator prior to the deadline.
Students are required to submit their assignment to Blackboard through a link provided in the ‘Assessment’ folder titled ‘Assessment 3 – Legal Case Study’. Submission links will be set up for each mode / location in which this unit is being studied for the relevant study period (e.g. Bentley Internal, Fully Online, Miri etc.), so please ensure that you submit your assignment document to the correct link.
The assignment will automatically be submitted to the plagiarism detection program, Turnitin. Please ensure that the version of your assignment submitted to the system is the final version and not an incomplete draft, as the version of your assignment that is in the system at the time the deadline passes will be the version that is marked for assessment purposes (even if it was a draft version that was inadvertently submitted).
Feedback on Assignments
All of the teaching staff are available to assist you with your learning in this unit. You should contact your lecturer or tutor if you need help understanding the course material or issues arising in the assignment. There is also a staffed Ed forum available for students to ask questions of the teaching team. You can also contact the unit coordinator if you are still unable to get the answer you are seeking. Please allow 48 hours (two working days) for a response to your query.
Unfortunately, it is just not possible for the teaching staff to review draft assignments for comment before submission as it is in effect double marking that would give some students an unfair advantage over others. If you require help with your assignment, either narrow the question or section of work to specific questions such as “what is meant by this part of the question?” or “do the areas of law pertain to a particular part of the Module 9 lecture?” Questions such as “have I done this part right?” or “should I include a discussion about this regulator in question 4?” will not be answered as any answer provided by the lecturer or tutor would directly/indirectly impact the mark that the querying student would receive for the assessment, causing the unfairness referred to above.
This assignment will be marked using a rubric, which will be provided to students ahead of time. In addition to providing the set feedback to students that is contained in the rubric, markers will also offer individual comments on what a student had done well and what they could have done better to earn a higher mark.
Assessments submitted early will not be marked before the due date. Please refer to the unit outline for the full procedure in relation to penalties for late submission and requests for an extension.

Cognitive Theories of Learning

Cognitive Theories of Learning
Cognitive theory of learning adopts a perspective of assessing and modifying people’s beliefs to development, adaptation, and change. The cognitive theory attempts to assess and modifying cognitions as a means of changing how people think, belief and how they act to shape their future. Individual differences represent the dimensions in which people vary in society since the cultures are diverse and dynamic social systems. Cultural variations are differences in relative emphasis. The beliefs regulate human functioning through cognitive, motivational and decisional processes. They affect whether individuals think in self-enhancing or self-debilitating ways in how they motivate themselves in difficulties and the choices they make at important decision points in life (Bandura, 2002). The beliefs contribute significantly to the quality of human functioning. People’s shared beliefs influence the type of future that they seek to achieve by using their resources and efforts to meet forcible opposition and discouragements.
Some people live in individualistically oriented systems hence changing their cognitions is so difficult. Group pursuits are usually less demanding of personal efficacy than individual pursuits. People who work independently have less need to be oriented to other people’s beliefs hence they live in their own societies. Beliefs operate in complex ways regardless of how cultural pursuits are socially structured to achieve social change. Changing someone’s beliefs involves changing their habits and it involves first finding out what makes them strong by accessing their reasoning patterning to the belief (Bandura, 2002). To change someone’s belief, it is necessary to establish their point of view and connect their beliefs to the opinion that you need to change by showing them different conclusions and better facts.

Reference
Bandura, A. (2002). Social cognitive theory in cultural context. Applied psychology, 51(2), 269-290. Retrieved from; https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1464-0597.00092

Health Belief

Health Belief
Society’s social principles are important in efforts to promote health and prevent disease. To companies and health researchers, it is a major tool for conducting a study to find out the cure and preventive measures for diseases.
Health belief is surrounded by varying cultural and political factors globally. The study of patients ‘ medical views on the various treatment methods that occur in all traditional societies is that each approach has its own clinical theories, causes, and healing mode. Treatment modality decisions are strongly dependent on the type of views patients have about the disorder and their social support network. Health beliefs help health researchers and clinicians create effective approaches to increase awareness of risk, encourage self-efficacy for weight loss and patterns of physical activity, and decrease disease rates (Jones, Roche $ Appel, 2009). This will promote a disease-free nation.
Children are a major beneficiary of health beliefs. The children’s Health Model has been established and it emphasizes the role of the caretaker influences on children’s health beliefs and actions. The role of the caretaker is to motivate the child, ensuring the child’s illness is treated and ensuring the child perceived benefits from medicines. Perceived benefits refer to believe in the advantages of the methods suggested for reducing the risk of the disease resulting from a particular behavior (Sharma, 2016). This will decrease the levels of mortality rates.
Medical values should benefit drug-making companies. As the public continues to have a positive belief that the medications are successful, the company will be able to predict habits of consumer safety. The government will be able to collect information to determine which population will be affected in order to satisfy its citizens.
References
Jones, E. J., Roche, C. C., & Appel, S. J. (2009). A review of the health beliefs and lifestyle behaviors of women with previous gestational diabetes. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing, 38(5), 516-526.
Sharma, M. (2016). Theoretical foundations of health education and health promotion. Jones & Bartlett Publishers.

The Christmas Tree as a Social Object

The Christmas Tree as a Social Object
Christmas is a globally celebrated Christian holiday synonymous with gifts and the sharing of presents. It is celebrated internationally, including the non-Christian nations. However, aside from gifts, shopping, bonfires, the abundance of food and Santa Claus, the most glaring sign of the beginning of the Christmas season is the Christmas tree. The tradition of the tree and the decorations was incepted by German-Americans who spread the culture across America and England by the mid 19th century. Most homesteads purchase Christmas trees of all sizes and materials to embody the holiday spirit. As McKechnie and Tynan (2006) demonstrate, the Christmas festivity entails spending a lot of money and time characterized in mass consumerism as evidence shows increased spending and a surge in commensurate consumer debt; it is imperative to note that the holiday is spiritually and socially enriching as a result of the cultivated culture of togetherness and sharing. Thus, the Christmas tree may cause financial detriment, however, the social impact is the symbol of fellowship and love.
The Christmas tree varies in the material used whereby some people opt for the expensive variant which is an actual tree cut down while others purchase a replica of the tree carved of plastic material. The tree is then adorned with decorations which are luminous lights and bulbs as well as colorful materials. The physical aspect of the object is not as important as the effect it has in a house as it embodies the Christmas spirit of love and gathering. It gets people into the mood of festivity and happiness. The social aspect is the most vital aside from the coloring and decorations making the house look beautiful and appealing. Manifestation and display of colors are known to elicit a positive mood and initiate excitement thus the adorning of luminous items on the tree.
The Christmas tree is the universally accepted symbol of the holiday. Some families have protocols on who should decorate the tree and what should be used to decorate. Women are commonly invested in the decoration of the Christmas tree to an extent the children may be barred from decorating it. The art of decoration has evolved to the extent that a specific person has authority on the adorning activity. McKechnie and Tynan (2006) establish from their research that some female heads of their homes are territorial about the decoration by presenting information on homes such as Judy’s where no one is allowed to participate in decorating and Stella’s where the children were allowed to help but she would redecorate once they fall asleep. Christmas trees are an intricate matter to an extent lack of decoration elicited negative perception on guests as insulting. Evidently, humans attach meaning to both symbols and actions with an example of the Christmas tree and the effort to decorate. The trees are normally put up after thanksgiving and taken down in the first week of January.
The issue of sustainability entails the environmental impact since most are cut down to facilitate this tradition. People should opt for either the recyclable PVC for artificial trees or recycle them by giving them to farmers as mulch or fodder, use them to minimize soil erosion or creating a habitat for the wildlife.
The financial implication has seen an upsurge for the consumers of the Christmas trees. Since the inception of the tradition, the price has escalated and the purchasers have increased as homesteads do not want to be left behind in the culture. A Christmas tree in a house is a symbol of happiness and festivity and people are nostalgic about it to an extent they have little concern for their financial detriment that comes later. Therefore, the Christmas tree has embodied the holiday and given people a feeling of belonging and nostalgia and has defined the festivity globally.
Reference
McKechnie, S., & Tynan, C. (2006). Social Meanings in Christmas Consumption: An Exploratory Study of UK Celebrants’ Consumption Rituals. Journal of Consumer Behaviour: An International Research Review, 5(2), 130-144. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/download/39488158/Social_meanings_in_Christmas_consumption20151028-28564-cr059n.pdf

In many industrial processes flow and pressure measurement is a vital and an integral part

Case study C

Part One
In many industrial processes flow and pressure measurement is a vital and an integral part. The transportation of fluids relies on accurate measurement of their flow. In this project, the equipment that will be suitable to measure the pressure and flow rate of beer during transportation is orifice plate. It is created by inserting an obstructing place in the pipe which has a round hole at the center which measures the pressure on each side of the orifice (Oliveira et al. 2009). The plates are trapped between two pipe flanges. Pressure taps on each flange make it possible to measure the Pressure differential across the plate. The dimensions of the plate and the pressure differential are combined with particular properties of the fluid which in this case is beer to determine the flow rate of the fluid through the pipe, thus, making it the best instrument to measure pressure and flow rate of beer in this case. Bernoulli’s equation is used for the calculation of the incompressible liquid flow
∆P=1/2 ρV_2^2-ρV_2^2
Given physical layout of a pipe, the equation can be modified to fit the dimensions of the pipe rather than velocity. Also, the equation perfectly assumes laminar flow which is not true in the real world since there is some amount of turbulence in the flow that converts kinetic energy into heat thus adding discharge coefficient (Cd ).

Q=〖C_d〗_√(2(P_(1-P_2 ) )/ρ ×A2/√(1-[A2/A1]^2 ))
Part two
Fluid is a substance that has no fixed shape and continually flows under applied shear stress. However, its properties determine how fluid can be used in technology and engineering as well as its behavior in fluid mechanics. The properties of a fluid comprise of density (ρ), which increases with the increase of the pressure of a liquid and decreases with increase in temperature and the density of any liquid is found by P= ρRT, where P is pressure, R is universal gas constant, and T is temperature. Viscosity is another fluid property that determines the amount of fluid resistant to shear stress. It decreases with increase in temperature of a liquid. Temperature is another liquid property that determines the degree of coldness or hotness of or heat intensity level of a fluid. It is measured in Kelvin scale which is widely used in engineering because it’s independent of properties of a substance, Celsius scale, and Fahrenheit scale. Pressure is the fluid force per unit area, denoted as P (Elger, Donald F., and John A. Roberson, 2016). There is also the specific volume property which is a volume that a fluid occupies per unit mass, a specific weight which is weight possessed by unit volume of a fluid which differs with changes in acceleration and specific gravity which is the ratio of the specific weight of the given fluid to the specific weight of the standard fluid. Some of the application includes; making glass objects of varying shapes though glass melting and pouring into molds due to the liquid flowing nature (viscosity) and ability to take the shape of a container. Water pumps also use the properties of a fluid (ability to flow and differences in pressure).

The equation of state as applies to fluids
PV= mRT{R is Universal Gas Constant)
P=(m/V)RT
P= ρRT (since ρ=m/V)
M =Mass
V=volume
P=Pressure
T=Temperature

BIBILIOGRAPHY
Oliveira, J.L.G., Passos, J.C., Verschaeren, R. and van der Geld, C., 2009. Mass flow rate measurements in gas–liquid flows by means of a venturi or orifice plate coupled to a void fraction sensor. Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science, 33(2), pp.253-260.
Elger, D.F. and Roberson, J.A., 2016. Engineering fluid mechanics (pp. 170-185). Hoboken (NJ): Wiley.