Cognitive Theories of Learning

Cognitive Theories of Learning
Cognitive theory of learning adopts a perspective of assessing and modifying people’s beliefs to development, adaptation, and change. The cognitive theory attempts to assess and modifying cognitions as a means of changing how people think, belief and how they act to shape their future. Individual differences represent the dimensions in which people vary in society since the cultures are diverse and dynamic social systems. Cultural variations are differences in relative emphasis. The beliefs regulate human functioning through cognitive, motivational and decisional processes. They affect whether individuals think in self-enhancing or self-debilitating ways in how they motivate themselves in difficulties and the choices they make at important decision points in life (Bandura, 2002). The beliefs contribute significantly to the quality of human functioning. People’s shared beliefs influence the type of future that they seek to achieve by using their resources and efforts to meet forcible opposition and discouragements.
Some people live in individualistically oriented systems hence changing their cognitions is so difficult. Group pursuits are usually less demanding of personal efficacy than individual pursuits. People who work independently have less need to be oriented to other people’s beliefs hence they live in their own societies. Beliefs operate in complex ways regardless of how cultural pursuits are socially structured to achieve social change. Changing someone’s beliefs involves changing their habits and it involves first finding out what makes them strong by accessing their reasoning patterning to the belief (Bandura, 2002). To change someone’s belief, it is necessary to establish their point of view and connect their beliefs to the opinion that you need to change by showing them different conclusions and better facts.

Reference
Bandura, A. (2002). Social cognitive theory in cultural context. Applied psychology, 51(2), 269-290. Retrieved from; https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1464-0597.00092